Angophora Corymbia Eucalyptus Hardiness Zones

by Windmill Outback Nursery

or - "Your guess is as good as mine!"


We have added this page so you can determine which species might grow best in your USDA Climate Zone. Please remember the climate zone ratings are for NORMAL temperatures.  Our nursery is located in USDA Zone 6-B, however, we have experienced unusual low temperatures of 20 F, which will kill plants not suited for those temperatures.  These ratings are just a guide, local temperatures, plant location, culture, moisture, wind, etc. are all climatic conditions that can vary with any location.

How do we come up with these plant ratings?

First things first, our plant ratings are strictly an educated guess on our part!  If this were Rocket science, then perhaps we could be more specific as they use controlled experiments.  For me, I use a combination of factors and some have been personal experience from actual tests I have conducted at our nursery. I have also factored in suggestions, experience, etc, from other growers in the USA. I have reviewed climatic information in Australia where these Eucalyptus species are found. Eucalyptus species are generally not found in just one isolated location, it does occur, but not very frequently. I looked at maximum and minimum temperatures recorded for about 700 different reporting stations. This data goes as far back as the mid 1800's for some areas and usually included lowest and highest temperature ever recorded, altitude, annual rainfall, etc.

I also looked at AUSLIG (Australian Surveying and Land Information Group) maps that show recorded locations of Eucalyptus species and tried to tie these in with the weather records.

When you look at the wide range that some of these species are found; it's difficult to say with 100% accuracy that something will or will not survive in your zone. I tried to utilize at least three different locations, average out the temperatures and come up with an "average" low rating. We have not even started to use the USDA Heat Zone ratings, nor, utilize the annual rainfall that was recorded for each station.

I might rate something hardy in Zone 9, yet you live in Zone 7 or someone else says it's hardy for yet a different zone and the confusion never seems to end.

Seed that comes from colder areas are more likely to produce a tree that is more cold hardy. As a commercial nursery grower and Australia seed importer, I can ask for seed from a particular location, but there is no guarantee that what we received came from the desired location. In dealing with the larger Australia seed companies, they have a reputation to uphold and they are usually pretty good in filling our needs.

You might see a specific Eucalyptus listed as Mt. ______ strain, this has generally proven to be the more cold hardy source for a particular species or one that comes from a particular area.

You might also see common names like "Snow Gum" given to different species, this does add more confusion to sort through. In Australia, most people call all Eucalyptus "Gums", unless they are in horticulture and you want to get down to one specific plant species.

There are about 900 different species of Angophora, Corymbia and Eucalyptus and many name changes are taking place. What used to be a specific Eucalyptus, is now being called a Corymbia species or Angophora species and the names do change back and forth very frequently. One day there will be a permanent name assigned and that will be the end of it, however, I would not expect this to happen any time soon!

The Australia climate is not like the USA climate.  California has about the closest thing as evidenced by the number of Eucalyptus species growing there.  For those of us in the "other 49 states" and for me in central Virginia, there are only a few Eucalyptus species that might survive here but I keep trying different species, seed lots, etc. to see if I can be successful with any of the species.  It's a real challenge, yet, I am not getting discouraged easily.  The only thing that beats a failure is a success and at least I can have fun while experimenting.

I could have used the "spin the bottle" technique or based my recommendations on how shiny a frogs back is.  Better yet, I probably should have asked one of those "Fortune Tellers" on TV for the correct answer as you know they would never tell you a lie.  Trying to compare our climate with that of Australia, our winter moisture with their droughts and any other multitude of unknown factors and all we can do is end up making an educated guess.  It's a guess, plain and simple and the only thing you can do is try for yourself and evaluate your results.  If you treated all Eucalyptus as an annual, then you will probably not be disappointed.  If by some some strange miracle it lives past the first year, keep your fingers crossed and hope for the best!  Some of you in warmer climates will definitely have success, others, well, you are probably like me and we keep trying.  We can blame it on the weather (always a good choice), blame it on the the famous "groundhog" day, or, perhaps you can just blame it on me.  Go ahead, I've had my share of it!  Heck, I can even blame it on some of the care (or lack of) that you gave it. 

It doesn't foster good customer relations if you expect miracles from us.  If you give us a fair shake, then I'll try to help where I can, but I can't guarantee any specific plant will live for you.  If you think of Eucalyptus as an annual and it lives longer, be happy.  If it doesn't, then go back to the paragraph above and chose your best option for spinning the bottle, searching for a frog, or you can elect to spend your money with a fortune teller and perhaps pick up a few stock tips as well.

For me, I'm doing everything I can to ensure you will be successful.  I do have a degree in horticulture, but sorry, I just never quite made it to the "Rocket Science" classes because all those botanical terms and foreign languages (chose Latin, Greek, Zenus or Hippie) still jumble around in my head to this very day! 

We search for the most "cold hardy" provenances for our seed.  We do actual field growing trials here in our Zone 6.  We experiment with new products each year.  We try different methods of production. We try bog germination, electric heat pads, misting timers.  We try new media mixes, seed enhancers like "smoke water", cold treatments, heck, I've even soaked seeds in the back of the toilet tank to wash out inhibitors.  The fact remains that we are not immune to failures or successes and we are willing to try different things.

If I have not totally turned you off to Eucalyptus by now, then read on.........

I recommend to plant out early in early spring or fall. This gives the plants time to develop into the surrounding soil and the root system is more established prior to winter onset. With fall planting, the watering requirements are less. If we don't have a very cold and prolonged wet winter, we usually have good results. 

Now, if you are really, really ready to take the challenge..................

With all that being said - here are "our" suggestions.

Surfing tip: Hold down shift key and left click on mouse button to open in a new window without leaving this page.

Zone

Angophora Species

1

8

costata: Sydney Red gum

2

9

hispida (cordifolia): Scrub Apple, Dwarf Apple

Zone

Corymbia Species
3

9

calophylla - Marri
4

9

citriodora: Lemon scented gum

5

9

eximia (E. eximia): Yellow bloodwood

6

9

eximia nana: Golden Gum
7

9

ficifolia: Scarlet flowered gum, Red Flowering Gum

8

8

gummifera: Red bloodwood

9

8

maculata: Spotted gum

10

10

papuana: Ghost gum

11

9

ptychocarpa: Swamp Bloodwood
12

9

trachyphloia: Brown bloodwood

Zone

Eucalyptus
13

9

acaciiformis: Wattle-leaved peppermint

14

8

aggregata: Rodway black gum

15

8

albens White box
16

9

albida - White-leaved Mallee
17

9

Albopurpurea - Purple flowered mallee
18

8

amygdalina: Black peppermint

19

9

andrewsii ssp andrewsii: New England blackbutt

20

8

Angulosa Ridge-fruited mallee
21

9

Angustissima subsp angustissima: Narrow-leaved mallee
22

8

apiculata: Narrow-leaved mallee ash

23

8

approximans: Barren Mountain mallee

24

7

archeri: Alpine cider gum

25

9

Aspratilis
26

7

'Baby Blue'

27

8

badjensis: Badja gum

28

8

baeuerlenii: Baeuerlen's gum

29

8

barberi: Barber's gum

29

8

baxteri: Brown stringybark
30

8

blakelyi: Blakely's red gum

31

9

botryoides: Bangalay, Southern Mahogany

32

9

Brachycorys - Cowcowing mallee
33

9

Brachyphylla -
34

8

bridgesiana: Apple box

35

9

brookeriana: Brooker's gum

36

9

Buprestium - Apple mallee
37

9

burdettiana: Burdett's mallee

38

8

burgessiana: Faulconbridge mallee ash

39

9

burracoppinensis: Burracoppin mallee
40

9

Caesia ssp caesia - Gungurru
41

9

caesia ssp magna: Silver Princess

42

9

Calcicola - Hamelin Bay Mallee
43

8

Callanii
44

9

Calycogona ssp calycogona - Gooseberry mallee
45

8

camaldulensis: Murray River Red Gum

46

9

campaspe: Silver topped Gimlet

47

8

camphora ssp camphora: Broad leaved Sally

48

9

cannonii (E. macrorhyncha ssp cannonii) Capetree stringybark

49

9

Cernua - red flowered moort
50

7

cinerea: Silver Dollar Gum, Argyle Apple

51

9

cladocalyx: Sugar Gum

52

9

cneorifolia: Kangaroo Island narrow-leaved mallee

53

8

coccifera: Tasmanian snow gum

54

9

Conferruminata - Bald Island marlock, Bushy Yate
55

8

consideniana: Yertchuk

56

9

Cooperiana Many-flowered mallee
57

8

cordata: Heart Leaved Silver Gum

58

9

Cornuta - Yate
59

9

Coronata - Crowned mallee
60

9

crebra: Narrow leaved Ironbark

61

9

crenulata: Silver Gum, Buxton Gum

62

8

Cretata Darke Peake Mallee
63

9

crucis: Southern Cross Mallee, Silver Mallee

64

9

curtisii: Plunkett Mallee

65

8

Cyanophylla Blue-leaved mallee
66

9

Cylindriflora White Mallee
67

8

cypellocarpa: Mountain gray gum

68

8

dalrympleana ssp dalrympleana: Broad leaved ribbon gum, Mountain gum

69

8

dealbata: Tumbledown red gum

70

8

deanei: Mountain blue gum

71

7

debeuzevillei: Jounama snow gum

72 9 Decurva Slender mallee
73

10

deglupta: Mindanao gum
74

8

delegatensis ssp tasmaniensis: Alpine ash

75

8

dendromorpha: Budawang ash

76

9

Dielsii:Cap-fruited mallee
77

9

Diptera - Two-winged gimlet
78

9

Diversicolor - Karri

79

8

Dives - Broad Leaf Peppermint

80

9

dolichorhyncha (E. forrestiana ssp dolichornhyncha): Fuchsia gum

81

9

Doratoxylon Spearwood mallee
82

8

Dumosa White mallee
83

9

Effusa Rough-barked gimlet
84

8

elata: River peppermint

85

9

eremophila: Tall Sand Mallee

86

9

Erythranda - Rosebud Gum
87

9

erythrocorys: Llyarie

88

9

Erythronema var erythronema - Red-flowered mallee, Lindsay Gum, White Mallee

89

9

Erythronema var marginata
90

9

Ewartiana - Ewart's mallee
91

9

Falcata Silver Mallet
92

8

fastigata: Brown barrel, Cut tail

93

8

Fibrosa ssp nubila Blue-leaved ironbark
94 9 Flavida - Yellow-flowered mallee
95 9 Flocktoniae Mallee Merrit
96 9 Foecunda - Narrow-leaved red mallee, Freemantle coastal dune mallee
97 9 Formanii - Forman's mallee
98

9

fraxinoides: White Mountain ash

99

8

Froggattii Kamarooka Mallee
100

9

gamophylla: Warilu, Blue-leaved Mallee

101

9

Gardeneri - Blue Mallet
102

8

Gillii Curly mallee
103

8

glaucescens: Tingiringi gum

104

8

globulus: Victorian blue gum

105

8

Globulus ssp bicostata Victorian blue gum
106

8

Globulus var compacta
107

8

goniocalyx: Long leaved box

108

9

grandis: Flooded gum

109

8

gregsonia: Wolgan dwarf snow gum

110

9

Grossa - Coarse-leaved mallee
111

7

gunnii 'Blue Ice'

112

9

Halophila - Salt Lake mallee

113

9

Hypoclamydea ssp smooth bark - Smooth-barked mallee
114 9 Incerata - Mount Day mallee
115 9 Incrassata - Ridge-fruited mallee
116 8 Intertexta Gum coolibah
117

8

johnstonii: Tasmanian yellow gum

118

9

Jucunda Yuna mallee
119

9

Jutsonii - Jutson's mallee
120

9

Kessellii Jurdacuttup mallee
121

9

Kingsmillii ssp kingsmillii - Kingsmill's mallee
122

9

kitsoniana: Gippsland mallee

123

9

Kochii ssp kochii - Oil mallee
124

8

kruseana: Brookleaf mallee

125

8

kybeanensis: Kybean mallee ash

126

9

laevopinea: Silvertop stringybark

127

9

Lane-poolei- Powderbark Gum, Salmon bark Wandoo
128

9

Lansdowneana ssp albopurpurea - Purple-flowered mallee

129

8

E.lansdowneana ssp lansdowneana: Crimson mallee

130

8

Largiflorens Black Box
131

9

Lata - Round-leaved mallee

132

9

Latens  - North Bannister mallee, Narrow-leaved red mallee
133

9

lehmanii: Bushy Yate

134

9

leptophylla: Narrow leaf red mallee

135

9

Le-souefii: Goldfield's Blackbutt

136

9

leucoxylon ssp megalocarpa: Large fruited South Australian blue gum

137

9

leucoxylon ssp petiolaris (rosea): Eyre Peninsula blue gum

138

8

ligustrina: Privet leaved stringybark

139

9

Livida - Mallee Wandoo
140

9

Longicornis
141

8

Longifolia Woollybutt
142

9

luehmanniana: Yellow top mallee ash

143

8

macarthurii: Camden woollybutt

144

9

macranda: Long-flowered Marlock

145

9

macrocarpa: Mottlecah, Rose of the West

146

8

macrorhyncha ssp macrorhyncha: Red stringybark

147

8

mannifera var maculosa (now E. mannifera): Brittle gum

148

9

megacornuta: Warty Yate

149

8

melanophloia: Silver Leaf Ironbark

150

8

Melliodora Yellow box
151

8

Micranthera Alexander River Mallee
152

8

microcorys: Tallowwood

153

9

microtheca: Coolibah

154

9

Miniata Darwin Woollybutt
155

8

mitchelliana: Mt. Buffalo sallee

156 'Moon Lagoon' - Fine-Leafed Mallee
157

7

moorei nana: Little Sally

158

9

morrisbyii: Morrisby's gum (endangered species)

159

9

muelleriana: Yellow stringybark

160

7

neglecta: Omeo gum

161

9

Newbeyi:  Newby's mallet, Beaufort Inlet mallet
162

9

nicholii: Nichol's willow leaf peppermint

163

8

niphophila: Narrow leaved apple

164

8

nitens: Shining gum

165

8

nitida: Smithton peppermint

166

8

notabilis: Blue Mountains mahogany

167

8

nova anglica: New England peppermint

168

9

nutans: Red flowering moort

169

8

obliqua: Messmate stringybark

170

8

oblonga: Narrow leaved stringybark

171

9

Obtusiflora: Dongarra mallee
172

8

occidentalis: Flat Topped Yate

173

8

oleosa: Giant Mallee, Red Mallee

174

8

Olsenii Woila Gum
175

9

Oraria - Ooragmandee
176

9

orbifolia: Disc leaf mallee, Round-leaved mallee

177

8

oreades: Blue Mountains ash

178

8

ovata: Swamp gum

179

8

Oxymitra Sharp-capped mallee
180

9

Pachyloma Kalgan Plains Mallee
181

8

pachyphylla: Red bud mallee
182

8

paliformis: Wadbillia ash

183

8

parvula: Small leaf gum

184

8

Patens Blackbutt

185

8

pauciflora: Snow gum

186

8

Pellita Large fruited red mahogany
187

9

Pendens - Badgingarra mallee
188

8

Peninsularis Cummins mallee
189

8

perriniana: Spinning gum

190

9

Phaenophylla

191

9

phenax: Kangaroo Island mallee

192

9

phoenicea: Scarlet gum

193

9

Pileata - Capped mallee
194

8

Pilularis Blackbutt
195

9

pimpiniana: Pimpin mallee

196

8

piperita: Sydney peppermint

197

9

Platycorys - Boorabbin mallee
198

9

Platypus ssp congregata Moort
199

9

platypus var platypus: Moort

200

9

Pleurocarpa Tallerack
201

9

Pluricaulis ssp porphyrea - Purple-leaved mallee
202

8

polyanthemos: Red box

203

9

polybractea: Blue leaved mllee

204

9

populnea: Bimble box

205

9

preissiana: Bell fruited mallee

206

9

propinqua: Small fruited gray gum

207

9

Pterocarpa
208

8

pulchella: White peppermint

209

8

pulverulenta: Silver leaf mountain gum

210

8

Pumila: Pokolbin mallee
211

9

punctata: Gray gum

212

9

pyriformis: Dowerin Rose

213

8

quadrangulata: White-topped box

214

8

radiata: Narrow leaved peppermint

215

9

Redunca
216

8

regnans: Swamp gum

217

8

remota: Kangaroo Island mallee ash

218

9

rhodantha: Rose mallee

219

9

Rigens: Saltlake mallee
220

9

Rigidula - Stiff-Leaved Mallee

221

8

risdonii: Risdon peppermint

222

8

robusta: Swamp mahogany

223

8

rodwayi: Swamp peppermint

224

8

rubida: Candlebark

225

8

Rudis - Flooded Gum
226

8

saligna: Sydney blue bum

227

9

salmonophloia: Salmon gum

228

9

Salubris - Gimlet

229

9

Sargentii ssp sargentii - Salt River Mallet
230

8

sclerophylla: Scribbly gum

231

9

Sepulcralis - Weeping Gum
232

8

serraensis: Grampians gum

233

9

sessilis: Finke River Mallee

234

9

Shirleyi: Shirley's silver leaved ironbark
235

9

Sideroxylon ssp Rosea - Pink or Red Ironbark, Mugga

236

9

Sieberi - Silvertop Ash, Ironbark, Coast Ash

237

9

smithii: Gully gum
238

9

Spathulata - (red flowers) - Swamp Mallet
239

9

Sporadica Mallee Yate
240

9

Staigeriana Lemon scented ironbark
241

9

Steedmanii Steedmans mallet
242

8

stellulata: Black sally

243

9

stoatei: Scarlet Pear gum

244 9 Stowardii - Fluted horn mallee
245 9 Striaticalyx - Koppi Mallee
246 9 Stricklandii - (yellow flowers) - Strickland's Gum
247

8

stricta: Blue Mountains mallee ash

248

8

Sturgissiana Ettrema mallee
249

9

subcrenulata: Tasmanian Alpine yellow gum

250

9

Suggrandis ssp suggrandis - Swamp Gimlet
251

9

Talyuberlup - Pretty Yate
252

9

tenuiramis: Silver peppermint

253

9

Tenuis - Whipstick mallet, Slender-stemmed mallet
254

8

tereticornis:Forest Red gum

255

9

tetragona: Dalyeruk, Tallerack

256

9

tetraptera: Square pod mallee

257

?

tinghaensis
258

9

torquata: Coral gum, Coolgardie gum

259

9

'Torwood' - (E. torquata x E. woodwardii)
260

9

triflora: Pigeon House ash

261

9

uncinata: Hook leaved mallee

262

8

urnigera: Urn gum

263

8

Vernicosa: Varnished gum

264

8

viminalis: Manna gum

265

8

viridis: - Green mallee

266

9

Websteriana - Webster's Mallee, Dainty Mallee or Heart-leaved Mallee
267

9

Websteriana subsp norsemanica
268

9

woodwardii: Lemon flowered mallee

269

9

Xanthonema subsp xanthonema - Yellow-flowered Mallee
270

9

yalatensis: Yalata mallee

271

9

youmanii: Youman's stringybark

272

9

youngiana: Ooldea mallee, Yarldarlba

273

9

Zopherophloia - Blackbutt Mallee

*The above editorial views are the sole responsibility of an overworked "Eucalyptus" AKA "Eucaholic" enthusiast!

Copyright Windmill Outback Nursery. All rights reserved.

Sunday August 28, 2011 01:12 PM

australiaplants@nexet.net

http://www.australiaplants.com/Eucalyptus_Zones.htm

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